Supporting Our Wounded Into Work

Raising funds to retrain and re-skill our wounded and support them in finding new careers outside the Military. You can help by making a donation or fundraising for the charity.

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MdS: Day Five In The Desert

Wednesday was the hardest day of the Marathon des Sables – the long day. With 81.5km to cover, there was a rest day yesterday to recover (or catch-up!) and our extraordinary WWTW competitors are battered and bruised…but still going strong. Support their incredible resilience by donating to their fundraising pages, listed at the bottom of the post, and read on for their updates…

The long day was extremely tough but I think my previous ultra racing helped me out a little as I know what it feels like to be going for so long. The mountain after 10km was also very cheeky but running up and down Pen y Fan must have helped as I made up a lot of places. It was just a case of gritting my teeth and going as hard as I could like the previous days – I’m racing myself so position is not an issue although it was very nice to finish so high on the toughest day. Just the marathon to go tomorrow and just hoping I have enough left in reserve. The fun-run on the final day will be taken easy! There are some amazing people here who are soldiering on through injuries, disability, illness, old age or just being slower! There are still people finishing the long leg after +30hrs – respect!

– Adam Chapman

The non-stop, long or double marathon stage. Done.

There’s been lots of discussion about whether that was the hardest physical thing that people have endured, and personally I’d put it in my top 3. And possibly on top. Certainly I can only recall once being so drained of energy, this time accompanied by a prolonged feeling of nausea, as well as the inevitable blister pain. I felt like I had very little in the tank from as early as about 2.5 hours in, and the next 11 hours were all about keeping going. The last 4 hours seemed like weeks. I was lucky to join a group of 3 others of similar energy levels but with the desire to keep pushing to the end, and we managed to keep each other going at the fastest walk we could manage, with occasional bouts of running. They were brilliant.

I’ve seen some of the worst blisters (and fatigue) I ever hope to see – my 8 or 9 are pretty minor. If I can eat well today I’ll be in good shape, & I hope to run much of tomorrow. And just maybe crack the top 150.

– Jamie Chisholm

All five members of the team are doing this challenge to fundraise for Walking With The Wounded, so please donate to their just giving page by clicking on their name. Accompanying their name is their list number, and each competitor can be sent a message of good luck and support.

Adam Chapman – 541

Jack Daniell – 565

Jamie Chisholm – 543

Rose Kingscote – 679

Chris Smith – 809

Next PostMarathon des Sables: Day Six, The End Of A Great Adventure!Previous PostMdS: Day Four In The Desert

There are some amazing people here who are soldiering on through injuries, disability, illness, old age or just being slower! There are still people finishing the long leg after +30hrs... - Adam Chapman

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